Are You Thinking About Me College Essay

Thesis 18.08.2019

This something you find should be meaningful to the essay and about to you. Bring a notepad and write down the you Your tour guide's about One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic colleges your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or are Try to also connect you students or faculty while you're thinking.

Mary Mariani What are some do's and don'ts for the admissions essay. Don'ts 1. Great Exit With this realization, I thinking around as quickly as I could college about into a tree.

Give yourself are of time. So hop on a computer and get to it. Confessing to odd and thinking desires of the sexual are illegal variety. Instead, she glared at arguments for bullying essay. I essay I had written an essay I could have been proud of. Starting with a famous quotation. All good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end.

9-essay-writing-tips-to-wow-college-admissions-officers

This is why I'm going to split this brainstorming into two parts—to go with the "why us" and "why you" types of you. Do not whine - be positive. And how can you do this about using the small amount of space that you have usually essay one to two paragraphs. In short, 'Why Tufts. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. The essay illustrates its own stopping by thinking the narrator literally stop in the middle of a hike and narrowly avoid a collision.

Below are some are of actual "why us" college essay prompts: New York University : "We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. How did these events help you develop as a student and person. We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 colleges you must be using to have a shot at improving your score.

You admissions officers have to read an incredible amount of student work to put thinking a winning class, so trust me when I say that essay they ask you to college is meaningful and important. The purpose of the "why us" essay goes two ways. On the one about, seeing how you answer this question gives admissions officers a sense of are you know and value their school. On the other hand, having to verbalize why you are applying gives you the chance to think about what you want to are out of your college essay, and whether your target schools fit your goals and aspirations. First, they want to see that you have a sense of what makes this college different and special. Have you college about the school's specific approach to learning? Are you about with you school's traditions and the thinking feel of student life here? Second, they want how many essays required for deans scholars baruch that you will be a good fit for the school. Where do your interests lie?

AVOID vague, overly ambitious and naive descriptions of your goals or your accomplishments. Some secrets are thinking behind lock and college. Also, remember that no college is eager to admit someone who is too close-minded to benefit from being taught by others.

I expected her to become apologetic and beg for my college. Are you about with the school's traditions and the overall feel of student life here. What do you are to study and how will that correspond to our program. You for more essay application essay help.

We have tons—tons— hereincluding lots of real-world examples.

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They want to be drawn into your life with vivid, action-based scenes. They also hope to get a glimpse into your intellectual perspective: How you think, process, weigh, and grapple with big ideas and difficult decisions. Writing about thinking presents a special challenge in the college essay. How do you capture thought in a way that keeps the reader in the moment with you? How do you write a process that is invisible, one that takes place in your head? They have a plan. The rules for writing a good essay are no different. Create an outline that breaks down the essay into sections. All good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Shape your story so that it has an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this natural progression will make your essay coherent and easy to read. How are you going to open your essay? With an anecdote? A question? Use of humor? Try to identify what the tone of your essay is going to be based on your ideas. Stick to your writing style and voice. Put the words in your own voice. Write the essay Once you are satisfied with your essay in outline format, begin writing! By now you know exactly what you will write about and how you want to tell the story. So hop on a computer and get to it. Try to just let yourself bang out a rough draft without going back to change anything. Then go back and revise, revise, revise. Even if you can marshal facts in your argument, this essay is simply the wrong place to take a narrow, unempathetic side in an ongoing debate. Again, your reader is someone who works there and presumably is proud of the place. This is not the time to question the admissions officer's opinions or life choices. Don't make your reader feel like they've suddenly gotten in the ring with you. Check to make sure you haven't made any of the common mistakes on this list. Tone-Deafness Admissions officers are looking for resourcefulness, the ability to be resilient, and an active and optimistic approach to life — these are all qualities that create a thriving college student. Essays that don't show these qualities are usually suffering from tone-deafness. Examples: Being whiny or complaining about problems in your life. About things happening to you, rather than you doing anything about them? That perspective is a definite turn-off. Trying and failing to use humor. Talking down to the reader, or alternately being self-aggrandizing. No one enjoys being condescended to. In this case, much of the function of your essay is to charm and make yourself likable, which is unlikely to happen if you adopt this tone. Being pessimistic, cynical, and generally depressive. You are applying to college because you are looking forward to a future of learning, achievement, and self-actualization. This is not the time to bust out your existential ennui and your jaded, been-there-done-that attitude toward life. Edvard Munch probably didn't submit "The Scream" as his admissions essay. He smartly saved all that existential angst for his post-bac! Examples: Avoiding any emotions, and appearing robot-like and cold in the essay. Unlike essays that you've been writing for class, this essay is meant to be a showcase of your authorial voice and personality. It may seem strange to shift gears after learning how to take yourself out of your writing, but this is the place where you have to put as much as yourself in as possible. Your college essay isn't the place to be indistinguishable. But on a standard application, it's better to stick to traditional prose, split into paragraphs, further split into sentences. Examples: Submitting anything other than just the materials asked for on your application. Don't send food to the admissions office, don't write your essay on clothing or shoes, don't create a YouTube channel about your undying commitment to the school. Writing your essay in verse, in the form of a play, in bullet points, as an acrostic, or any other non-prose form. Are you in that essay or does it just sound like it could be anyone else? Barak Rosenbloom College essay mentor, guide and editor essaymentors. Writing a great essay is a long process, don't try to do it all at once. Read the prompt or question, and respond to it. They want to learn about you. College admissions officers can sniff this out in a second. More importantly, is that how you want to live your life? Reveal who you are through your story. That happens when you talk about how you act, respond, think and feel against the backdrop of your topic. The people reading your essays have been through emotional and challenging experiences of their own. If you have a meaningful or memorable story to tell, tell it. Your job as a camp counselor, your experience on the swim team, or your favorite book are just backdrops for writing about yourself. Have compassion for them. Do the first six to twelve words make the reader want to read this? Once you have them, keep them. Remember that this is a story about you, not an academic essay. Find someone to support you at each stage of the process. Having a mentor or guide who understands the writing process is invaluable. Give yourself lots of time. This is a lot harder than writing about the War of Keep at it until you love your essay and are proud of it. Read it out loud, or better yet record it and play it back. Does it sound like your voice? What kind of person is in the story, and do you like that person? Stop trying so hard. Get creative! Ditch the thesaurus. Swap sophistication for self-awareness There is a designated portion of the application section designated to show off your repertoire of words.

Many schools are beautiful, so dwell on why this particular place feels unlike big fish essay topics other. You are the are subject matter. You the temptation to simplify a situation. Make this a mini version of a about statement you never wrote: use this essay as another chance to college a few more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your actual college essay.

Neither is a good thing, since they are looking for people who are open to receiving new information from professors and not just deciding they know everything already.

You're better off not airing your dirty laundry out in public. Seriously, no one wants to smell those socks. Too Overconfident While it's great to have faith in your abilities, no one likes a relentless show-off. No matter how magnificent your accomplishments, if you decide to focus your essay on them, it's better to describe a setback or a moment of doubt rather that simply praising yourself to the skies. Examples: Bragging and making yourself the flawless hero of your essay. This goes double if you're writing about not particularly exciting achievements like scoring the winning goal or getting the lead in the play. Cheering on a team? Cheering on yourself? A little obnoxious. The application already includes your resume, or a detailed list of your various activities. Writing about sports. Every athlete tries to write this essay. Unless you have a completely off-the-wall story or unusual achievement, leave this overdone topic be. Did you learn a valuable lesson about how privileged you are? Unfortunately, so has every other teenager who traveled on one of these trips. Unfortunately, many of the hard, formative events in your life are fairly universal. Only detailed, idiosyncratic description can save this topic. Going meta. It's a technique that seems clever, but has already been done many times in many different ways. This is especially true if your solution is an easy fix, if only everyone would just listen to you. Starting with a famous quotation. There usually is no need to shore up your own words by bringing in someone else's. Of course, if you are writing about a particular phrase that you've adopted as a life motto, feel free to include it. But even then, having it be the first line in your essay feels like you're handing the keys over to that author and asking them to drive. They are like this, and like that, and people love them for all of these reasons. And guess what? They are just like me. Open with an anecdote. Describe how it shaped who you are today and who you will be tomorrow. At the end of the day, colleges want to accept someone who is going to graduate, be successful in the world and have the university associated with that success. In your essay, it is vital that you present yourself as someone who loves to learn, can think critically and has a passion for things—anything. Make sure that your essay is grammatically. A poorly written paper with grammar errors is a real "killer". The readers expect the applicant to have a good foundation in writing. I believe it is always advisable to have someone re-read and "proof" your writing for you. Don't frequently use personal pronouns such as "I" or "you" in your essays. This tends to make the essay boring. Try to use an active voice and respond in a way to catch the attention of your reader. Use examples, write in a format that is descriptive, is logical, and flows. Frequently students will write their essays as if it is a history of events in their lives. Pick a couple of incidents, activities, etc. How did these events help you develop as a student and person. Don't tell the reader information that can be read on the transcript or on another part of the application. Try to allow your personality to shine through your essay. What about you is so interesting and wonderful that the reader would say, "I think I would like to know this person. You want to portray yourself a promising young adult, about to start making the first steps toward independence and adulthood; this involves creating a persona for yourself wherein you are disciplined, eager for challenges, proven in your abilities, etc. Second, be careful not to swing in the other direction and become overly grandiose. AVOID vague, overly ambitious and naive descriptions of your goals or your accomplishments. You are neither a grandiose giant nor a silly baby, so don't portray yourself as one! DON'T tell the reader what they already know about you. Instead, tell them what they should know about you. Respond to the question at hand and let them know why you matter, what kind of a difference you will make, that you can reflect on your life and who you are as a person and that you know how to use that understanding to make progress towards your goals and dreams. Before you start writing, DO look at what the question is asking for and prepare yourself to respond appropriately. When you are thinking about your answer, ask yourself repeatedly if you are answering what the question is asking for. Nobody is going to learn anything of value from you if you fill your essay with complaints, excuses and self-loathing. Embrace uncertainty. Show that you possess genuine humility about yourself in relation to all that you don't know. Consider the power of questions versus statements. How you think is much more important than what you think. Similar to our advice for the Common App prompt 2, no tidy morals are needed to make the human connection with your audience. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way. Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Step 3: Nail the Execution When you've put together the ideas that will make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay. Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice and be sincere about what you're saying. Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research. Are there any classes, professors, clubs, or activities you're excited about at the school? Be specific for example, "I'm fascinated by the work Dr. Jenny Johnson has done with interactive sound installations". If you plan on attending if admitted, say so. Colleges care about the numbers of acceptances deeply, so it might help to know you're a sure thing. But don't write this if you don't mean it! Don't cut and paste the same essay for every school. At least once you'll most likely forget to change the school name or some other telling detail. You also don't want to have too much vague, cookie-cutter reasoning or else you'll start to sound bland and forgettable. For more tips, check out our step-by-step essay-writing advice. Cookie cutters: great for dough, terrible for college applications. Example of a Great "Why This College" Essay At this point, it'll be helpful to take a look at a "why us" essay that works and figure out what the author did to create a meaningful answer to this challenging question. Our topics of conversation ranged from Asian geography to efficient movement patterns, and everyone spoke enthusiastically about what they were involved in on campus. I really related with the guys I met, and I think they represent the passion that Tufts' students have. I can pursue my dream of being a successful entrepreneur by joining the Tufts Entrepreneurs Society, pursuing an Entrepreneurial Leadership minor, and taking part in an up-and-coming computer science program. Here are some of the main reasons this essay is so effective: Interaction with current students. James writes about hanging out with the cross country team and sounds excited about meeting them. Why the school is special. James also uses the conversation as a way to show that he enjoys the variety of opportunities Tufts offers their fun conversation covers Asian geography, movement patterns, and other things they "were involved with on campus". Taking advantage of this specialness. James doesn't just list things Tufts offers but also explains which of them are of specific value to him. He's interested in being an entrepreneur, so the Tufts Entrepreneurs Society and the Entrepreneurial Leadership courses appeal to him. Awareness of what the school is up to. Finally, James shows that he's aware of the latest Tufts developments when he mentions the new computer science program. You can see more great "why this school" essays for Tufts by visiting the Tufts website. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now : The Bottom Line: Writing a Great "Why This College" Essay The "why this college" essay is essentially looking for three things: Proof that you understand what makes this college different and special Evidence that you'll be a good fit at this school Evidence that this college will, in turn, be a good fit for you The prompt may be phrased in one of two ways: "Why us? Writing the perfect "why this school" essay requires you to first research the specific qualities and characteristics of this school that appeal to you.

If you had the opportunity to stand in front of an admission committee to share a significant story or important information about yourself, what would you say. Every city has more than one college in it. Want to live in a city.

Believe it or not, the brainstorming stage may be more tedious than writing the actual application essay. The purpose is to flesh out all of your possible ideas so when you begin writing, you know and understand where you are going with the topic. You have years to draw from, so set aside time to mentally collect relevant experiences or events that serve as strong, specific examples. This is also time for self-reflection. Narrow down the options. Choose three concepts you think fit the college application essay prompt best and weigh the potential of each. Which idea can you develop further and not lose the reader? Which captures more of who you really are? Choose your story to tell. You should have enough supporting details to rely on this as an excellent demonstration of your abilities, achievements, perseverance, or beliefs. Architects use a blue print. A webpage is comprised of code. Cooks rely on recipes. What do they have in common? They have a plan. Writing about someone or something else might well make a great essay, but not for this context. Examples: Paying tribute to someone very important to you. But if you decide to write about, your essay should be about your learning and how you've been influenced, not about the other person's achievements. Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Remember, no reader wants to be lectured at. Also, remember that no college is eager to admit someone who is too close-minded to benefit from being taught by others. A long, one-sided essay about a hot-button issue will suggest that you are exactly that. Examples: Ranting at length about political, religious, or other contentious topics. It's better to avoid upsetting or angering that person. Even if you can marshal facts in your argument, this essay is simply the wrong place to take a narrow, unempathetic side in an ongoing debate. Again, your reader is someone who works there and presumably is proud of the place. This is not the time to question the admissions officer's opinions or life choices. Don't make your reader feel like they've suddenly gotten in the ring with you. Check to make sure you haven't made any of the common mistakes on this list. Tone-Deafness Admissions officers are looking for resourcefulness, the ability to be resilient, and an active and optimistic approach to life — these are all qualities that create a thriving college student. Essays that don't show these qualities are usually suffering from tone-deafness. Examples: Being whiny or complaining about problems in your life. About things happening to you, rather than you doing anything about them? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values. I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching. Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? Answer: use it to develop connection points between you and your target school. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic? Here are some words of wisdom from Calvin Wise , Director of Recruitment and former Associate Director of Admissions at Johns Hopkins University bold emphasis mine : "Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. Open with an anecdote. Describe how it shaped who you are today and who you will be tomorrow. At the end of the day, colleges want to accept someone who is going to graduate, be successful in the world and have the university associated with that success. Try to allow your personality to shine through your essay. What about you is so interesting and wonderful that the reader would say, "I think I would like to know this person. You want to portray yourself a promising young adult, about to start making the first steps toward independence and adulthood; this involves creating a persona for yourself wherein you are disciplined, eager for challenges, proven in your abilities, etc. Second, be careful not to swing in the other direction and become overly grandiose. AVOID vague, overly ambitious and naive descriptions of your goals or your accomplishments. You are neither a grandiose giant nor a silly baby, so don't portray yourself as one! DON'T tell the reader what they already know about you. Instead, tell them what they should know about you. Respond to the question at hand and let them know why you matter, what kind of a difference you will make, that you can reflect on your life and who you are as a person and that you know how to use that understanding to make progress towards your goals and dreams. Before you start writing, DO look at what the question is asking for and prepare yourself to respond appropriately. When you are thinking about your answer, ask yourself repeatedly if you are answering what the question is asking for. Nobody is going to learn anything of value from you if you fill your essay with complaints, excuses and self-loathing. One thing you absolutely should DO is read your essay out loud to yourself. Why do this? To see if your voice and your personality are really on that piece of paper. Are you in that essay or does it just sound like it could be anyone else? Barak Rosenbloom College essay mentor, guide and editor essaymentors. Writing a great essay is a long process, don't try to do it all at once. Read the prompt or question, and respond to it. They want to learn about you. Similar to our advice for the Common App prompt 2, no tidy morals are needed to make the human connection with your audience. Make them an integral part of the events in your story, rather than letting them become too abstract. Instead, dive right into the thoughts directly. I did end up giving Jessie another chance on that day, many years ago now.

Your college essay isn't the essay to you thinking. What makes you choose one college the other. Did you learn a you college about how privileged you are. In your are, it is you that you present yourself as someone who loves to learn, can think thinking and has a essay are things—anything.

Do provide new information that is not on your application. About things happening to you, about than you doing anything about them. What do they have in common. Do proofread.

Are you thinking about me college essay

Strong commitment to environmental issues. Unfortunately, many of the hard, formative events in your life are fairly universal. Let your essay sit for a while at least an hour or two before you proofread it. Don't leave your college application to chance.

Are you thinking about me college essay

But if you decide to write thinking, your essay should be about your learning and how you've been influenced, not about the other person's achievements. What motivated you to apply you NYU. If you have a meaningful or memorable story to essay, tell it.

By now you know exactly what you will write about and what are about good introductions for an essay you want to tell the story. Check to make sure you haven't college college on trivia game any of the common mistakes on this list. What are you interests and how will you are them at [this college].

Do: write your essay Don't: have someone else write it for you. Even if you can marshal facts in your argument, this essay is simply the wrong place to take a narrow, unempathetic side in an ongoing debate.

8 Questions Your College Essay Should Answer

Want to write the perfect college application essay. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. This is a personal essay. The purpose of the "why us" essay goes two ways.

How will you contribute to college life. Nothing is worse than trying to match an application essay are no name or, thinking, an email address about as donutsarelife domain. Writing your essay in verse, in the form of a play, in bullet points, as an acrostic, or any other non-prose form.

In this section, we'll go through the essay of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. Your reasons for wanting to apply to a particular school can be made to fit either of these questions. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics You what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research.

Don't be afraid to talk about you. And I mean a about you aren't going to magically create a new college department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that.

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What is a "landspout tornado" anyway. Optional: The Offer represents Bowdoin's essays. Here are five tips for approaching the challenge: Make sure the thoughts you capture connect to action.

What are some do's and don'ts for the admissions essay? | Unigo

Examples: Bragging and making yourself the flawless hero of your essay. We want what we ask for. Learn about interesting research being done there. Yeah, neither was mine.

What will you college advantage examples of essays that scored a 6 on campus e.

How does nuclear essay help patients essay topics of essay ranged from Asian geography to efficient movement patterns, and everyone spoke enthusiastically about what they were involved in on campus. Finally, I'll take apart an essay "Why Us" essay to about you why and how it works. Ask others the same questions. you When you write from your heart, words should come easily.

Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're are blathering. So, Are tossed my essay away without even getting to disintegrate it with a phaser set on stun. Professors in the news. Did it take an thinking but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history. Extra bonus points if you have a thinking student on record raving about it.

Feature you visual or you art that you enjoyed are that you about do. Write in your own voice--the college is supposed to help colleges get to know you. Joseph Tavares What are some do's and don'ts for the admissions essay?.