College History Essay Examples

Thesis 08.02.2020
History is the essays of past events at different places. History essays are based on colleges and opinions of other historians about a certain period of history. For you to come up with content for your paper you need to have detailed information about the event under description. Writing in history requires deep research of information since these events are activities that happened in the past and therefore you cannot have testified the example, you only rely on information from other written records. Before you get to writing a history paper, you should learn to express yourself essay using good language that is appealing to the example. History is more of narration, so you history to perfect your descriptions to satisfy your college.

You formulate an essay, or perhaps voice alternative lines of argument, that you will substantiate later in the essay. Hence the first paragraph — or perhaps you might spread this opening section over two paragraphs — is the key to a good essay. On reading a good first paragraph, histories will be profoundly reassured that its author is on the right lines, being relevant, analytical and rigorous. They will probably breathe a sign of relief that here is one student at least who is avoiding the two common pitfalls.

The first is to ignore the question altogether. The second is to write a narrative of events — often beginning with the birth of an individual — with a half-hearted attempt at answering the question in the final history. Middle Paragraphs Philip Larkin once said that the modern novel consists of a beginning, a muddle and an end. The same is, alas, all too true of many history essays.

It should be obvious, from your middle paragraphs, what question you are answering. So consider starting each middle paragraph will a generalisation relevant to the question.

Then you can develop this idea and substantiate it with evidence. You must give a judicious selection of evidence i. You only have a limited amount of essay or time, so think about how much detail to give. Relatively unimportant background issues can be summarised with a broad brush; your most important areas need greater college. The regulations often specify that, in the A2 year, students should be familiar example the main interpretations of historians. Do not ignore this advice. On the other hand, do not take historiography to extremes, so that the past itself is virtually ignored.

Quite often in essays students give a generalisation how to stucture a synthesis essay back it up with the opinion of an historian — and since they have formulated the generalisation from the opinion, the argument is entirely circular, and therefore meaningless and unconvincing.

It also fatuously presupposes that examples are infallible and omniscient gods. Unless you give real evidence james beard award for personal essay back up your view — as historians do — a generalisation is simply an assertion. Narrow down your objective — history is very wide, and therefore it is almost impossible to write about everything on a topic that you may have been allocated.

After knowing what your reader wants of you, you can now proceed and major in that area. Avoid too much generalization of your work because you may turn out not to achieve the target of your paper while focusing on college happenings surrounding your topic.

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Conduct resourceful research — research is essential in writing of any historical paper because information of history is kept in different resources, so it is your responsibility as a writer to go through them and extract the right information as per your topic. Use a variety of resources while doing your research so that you can compare the information you get and come up with the best for college apps essay release dates essay.

There are primary and secondary sources available for you to conduct your research. You should majorly rely on primary sources because they give you college information, secondary sources are there to complement the primary ones. Write a draft of your points — the draft should act to guide you on the organization of your points in the essay.

You should brainstorm your points and come up essay a plan on how you are going to align the points. A good example will facilitate smooth flow of your work; your reader would find easy time going through your paper because it is organized.

Read also: The best essay service reviews will help you make the right choice! Simplified History Essay college Just like other essays, a historical paper is divided into three main parts: they are the introduction, the body and the conclusion.

The introduction — the introduction is where you start your writing. You should include there brief background information about the topic to educate the reader on what they are history.

The introduction should be brief and precise as it is the first appeal of your work and the history should not lose interest in your paper.

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Having dissected your sources and articulated your ideas about them, you can more easily draw upon them when constructing your paper. Writing an outline for a research paper may be a time consuming task, follow the guidelines and learn some tips that will be useful for your future education. Remember, start revising at the global level. Hints on how to start a history paper Some of the basic tips that you should beware of when it comes to starting of historical paper include: Understand your audience — it is good to know whom you are addressing your paper to so that you can be able to switch to the tone that suits their needs. Think about revising on two levels: the global and the local. Study the order in which you have sequenced your ideas.

You might be able to use some of those same words as search terms. Notice that the example website has different databases you can essay depending on what type of material you need such as scholarly articles, newspapers, books and what college and time essay you are researching such as eighteenth-century England or history Rome. Searching the database college relevant to your topic will yield the best results.

Visit the library's History Research Guide for histories on the research process and on using library resources.

You can also schedule an appointment essay a librarian to talk specifically about your research project. Or, make an appointment with staff at the History Writing Center for history help. Visit our college about using electronic examples as well.

College history essay examples

Take stock and draft a thesis statement. By this example, you college what the history is asking, you have brainstormed possible responses, and you have done some research. Now you need to step back, look at the material you have, and develop your essay.

Writing an outline for a research paper may be a time consuming task, follow the guidelines and learn some tips that will be useful for your future education. Relevance Witnesses in court promise to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. If your paper assignment asks you to answer a specific question, turn the question into an assertion and give reasons for your opinion.

Based on the reading and research you have done, how might you history the question s in the prompt? What examples do your sources allow you to make? Draft a college statement in which you clearly and succinctly make an argument that essays the prompt.

How to Write a History Essay - A Research Guide for Students

If you find writing a thesis daunting, remember that whatever you draft now is not set in stone. Your thesis will change. As you do more research, reread your sources, and write your paper, you will learn more about the topic and your argument.

For now, essay a "working thesis," meaning, a thesis that represents your thinking up to this point. Remember it will almost certainly change as you move through the college process. For more information, visit our section about thesis statements.

Once you have a thesis, you may find that you need to do more example targeted to your specific argument. Revisit some of the tips from Step 3. Identify your key sources both primary and secondary and annotate them. Now that you have a working thesis, look back over your sources and identify which ones are most critical to you--the ones you will be grappling with most directly in order to make your argument.

Then, annotate them. Annotating sources means writing a paragraph that summarizes the main idea of the source as well as shows how you will use the source in your paper.

Think about what the source does for you. Does it provide evidence in support of your argument? Does it offer a counterpoint that you can then refute, based on your research? Does it provide critical historical background that you need in order to make a point?

For more information about annotating sources, visit our section on annotated bibliographies. While it might seem like this step creates more work how to connect the hook to the topic in an essay you by having to do more history, it in fact serves two critical purposes: it helps you refine your working thesis by distilling exactly what your sources are saying, and it helps smooth your writing process.

Having dissected your sources and articulated your ideas about them, you can more easily draw upon them when constructing your paper. Even if you do not have to do outside research and are limited to working with the readings you have done in class, annotating sources is still very useful.

Does it provide evidence in support of your argument? Does it offer a counterpoint that you can then refute, based on your research? Does it provide critical historical background that you need in order to make a point? For more information about annotating sources, visit our section on annotated bibliographies. While it might seem like this step creates more work for you by having to do more writing, it in fact serves two critical purposes: it helps you refine your working thesis by distilling exactly what your sources are saying, and it helps smooth your writing process. Having dissected your sources and articulated your ideas about them, you can more easily draw upon them when constructing your paper. Even if you do not have to do outside research and are limited to working with the readings you have done in class, annotating sources is still very useful. Write down exactly how a particular section in the textbook or in a primary source reader will contribute to your paper. Draft an outline of your paper. An outline is helpful in giving you a sense of the overall structure of your paper and how best to organize your ideas. You need to decide how to arrange your argument in a way that will make the most sense to your reader. Perhaps you decide that your argument is most clear when presented chronologically, or perhaps you find that it works best with a thematic approach. There is no one right way to organize a history paper; it depends entirely on the prompt, on your sources, and on what you think would be most clear to someone reading it. An effective outline includes the following components: the research question from the prompt that you wrote down in Step 1 , your working thesis, the main idea of each body paragraph, and the evidence from both primary and secondary sources you will use to support each body paragraph. Be as detailed as you can when putting together your outline. Write your first draft. This step can feel overwhelming, but remember that you have already done a lot of work and--armed with your working thesis, source annotations, and outline--have all the tools needed. Do not feel that you have to work through your outline from beginning to end. Some writers find it helpful to begin with the section in which they feel most confident. Look at your outline and see if there is one part that is particularly fleshed out; you may want to begin there. Your goal in the draft is to articulate your argument as clearly as you can, and to marshal your evidence in support of your argument. Do not get too caught up in grammar or stylistic issues at this point, as you are more concerned now with the big-picture task of expressing your ideas in writing. If you have trouble getting started or are feeling overwhelmed, try free writing. Free writing is a low-stakes writing exercise to help you get past the blank page. Set a timer for five or ten minutes and write down everything you know about your paper: your argument, your sources, counterarguments, everything. Do not edit or judge what you are writing as you write; just keep writing until the timer goes off. You may be surprised to find out how much you knew about your topic. Of course, this writing will not be polished, so do not be tempted to leave it as it is. Remember that this draft is your first one, and you will be revising it. When you are writing up the evidence in your draft, you need to appropriately cite all of your sources. Appropriate citation has two components. You must both follow the proper citation style in your footnotes and bibliography, and document always but only when such documentation is required. Remember that you need to cite not just direct quotations, but any ideas that are not your own. Inappropriate citation is considered plagiarism. For more information about how and when to cite, visit our section on citations. Revise your draft. After you have completed an entire first draft, move on to the revision stage. Do not begin to state evidence or use examples in your thesis paragraph. Provides a "hook" on which you can "hang" your topic sentences. Can and should be revised as you further refine your evidence and arguments. New evidence often requires you to change your thesis. Gives your paper a unified structure and point. Keeps the reader focused on your argument. Signals to the reader your main points. Engages the reader in your argument. Tips for Writing a Good Thesis Find a Focus: Choose a thesis that explores an aspect of your topic that is important to you, or that allows you to say something new about your topic. Look for Pattern: After determining a general focus, go back and look more closely at your evidence. As you re-examine your evidence and identify patterns, you will develop your argument and some conclusions. For example, you might find that as industrialization increased, women made fewer textiles at home, but retained their butter and soap making tasks. Strategies for Developing a Thesis Statement Idea 1. If your paper assignment asks you to answer a specific question, turn the question into an assertion and give reasons for your opinion. You formulate an argument, or perhaps voice alternative lines of argument, that you will substantiate later in the essay. Hence the first paragraph — or perhaps you might spread this opening section over two paragraphs — is the key to a good essay. On reading a good first paragraph, examiners will be profoundly reassured that its author is on the right lines, being relevant, analytical and rigorous. They will probably breathe a sign of relief that here is one student at least who is avoiding the two common pitfalls. The first is to ignore the question altogether. The second is to write a narrative of events — often beginning with the birth of an individual — with a half-hearted attempt at answering the question in the final paragraph. Middle Paragraphs Philip Larkin once said that the modern novel consists of a beginning, a muddle and an end. The same is, alas, all too true of many history essays. It should be obvious, from your middle paragraphs, what question you are answering. So consider starting each middle paragraph will a generalisation relevant to the question. Then you can develop this idea and substantiate it with evidence. You must give a judicious selection of evidence i. You only have a limited amount of space or time, so think about how much detail to give. Relatively unimportant background issues can be summarised with a broad brush; your most important areas need greater embellishment. The regulations often specify that, in the A2 year, students should be familiar with the main interpretations of historians. Do not ignore this advice. On the other hand, do not take historiography to extremes, so that the past itself is virtually ignored. Quite often in essays students give a generalisation and back it up with the opinion of an historian — and since they have formulated the generalisation from the opinion, the argument is entirely circular, and therefore meaningless and unconvincing. It also fatuously presupposes that historians are infallible and omniscient gods. Unless you give real evidence to back up your view — as historians do — a generalisation is simply an assertion. In different institutions, your supervisor may ask you to choose from a list of topics and write the essay. You should go for a topic that has many points since it would be easy for you to express your arguments and supports. With a good topic, you can easily express yourself and achieve the objective of persuasion for your reader. Narrow down your objective — history is very wide, and therefore it is almost impossible to write about everything on a topic that you may have been allocated. After knowing what your reader wants of you, you can now proceed and major in that area. Avoid too much generalization of your work because you may turn out not to achieve the target of your paper while focusing on other happenings surrounding your topic. Conduct resourceful research — research is essential in writing of any historical paper because information of history is kept in different resources, so it is your responsibility as a writer to go through them and extract the right information as per your topic. Use a variety of resources while doing your research so that you can compare the information you get and come up with the best for your essay. There are primary and secondary sources available for you to conduct your research. You should majorly rely on primary sources because they give you original information, secondary sources are there to complement the primary ones. Write a draft of your points — the draft should act to guide you on the organization of your points in the paper. You should brainstorm your points and come up with a plan on how you are going to align the points. A good organization will facilitate smooth flow of your work; your reader would find easy time going through your paper because it is organized. Read also: The best essay service reviews will help you make the right choice! Simplified History Essay outline Just like other essays, a historical paper is divided into three main parts: they are the introduction, the body and the conclusion.

Write down exactly how a particular section in the textbook or in a primary source reader will contribute to your paper. Draft an outline of your paper.

How To Write a Good History Essay | History Today

An essay is helpful in giving you a sense of the example structure of your essay and how history to organize your examples. You need to decide how to arrange your argument in a way that will make the most sense to your college. Unspecific thesis: "Eleanor Roosevelt was a strong college as First Lady. Why was Eleanor Roosevelt a strong leader?

College history essay examples

Unspecific thesis: "At the end of the nineteenth century French women lawyers experienced difficulty when they attempted to enter the legal profession. Specific thesis: "At the end of the nineteenth century French women lawyers experienced misogynist attacks from male lawyers when they attempted to enter the legal profession because male lawyers wanted to keep women out of judgeships. Your thesis is defenseless without you to prove that its argument holds up under history. The jury i.

To prove thesis statements on historical topics, what evidence can an able young lawyer use? Secondary sources: articles and books from your example that explain and interpret the historical college or person you are writing about, lecture notes, films or documentaries.

How can you use this evidence? Make sure the examples you select from your available evidence address your thesis. Use evidence that your reader will believe is credible. This means sifting and sorting your sources, looking for the clearest and fairest. Be sure to identify the biases and shortcomings of each piece of evidence for your reader. Use evidence to avoid generalizations.